Thomas J. Burns National Student Seminar

1966 – 2001 Thomas J. Burns National Student Seminar

The National Student Seminar was founded by Thomas J. Burns from The Ohio State University in 1966. The annual seminar provided an opportunity for undergraduate students to discuss emerging issues in business, to share ideas with future colleagues and competitors, and to learn from one another by sharing educational experiences and ideas socially .  

Thomas J. Burns was a long-time faculty advisor for the Omicron chapter at The Ohio State University as well as the President of the National Council (now the International Board of Directors), term 1978-1979. Professor Burns also served on the Beta Alpha Psi Board of Directors  and was very influential in the development of many Beta Alpha Psi program initiatives .

Beta Alpha Psi hosted – with sponsoring support from PwC – the Graduate Case Seminar designed especially for graduate student members. Each chapter could nominate one graduate student member to attend the seminar, representing his or her chapter. The annual seminar provided graduate students the opportunity to enjoy both a scholarly academic experience and social activities. For instance, in 2003, students engaged with professionals to experience the issues facing management and the IPO team when taking a company public for the first time.

2002-2006 T.J. Burns Undergraduate and Graduate Case Seminar 

In 2002, the Board of Directors decided to combine the National Student Seminar and the Graduate Case Seminar into one event that shared international themes that all participants would benefit from. 

Manuscript Awards

Undergraduate 1929 – 2000 - The manuscript awards encouraged undergraduate students to submit research papers on technical accounting subjects of a controversial nature. The winners of the manuscript contest were selected by a panel of three members from Beta Alpha Psi’s Academic Leadership and eventually the National Advisory Forum (now the Professional Partners).

Graduate 1980 – 2000 - In 1980, a separate manuscript contest was implemented for graduate students. Topics for the graduate competition related to current issues facing the accounting profession at the time and, as with the undergraduate competition, often dealt with controversial issues, such as harmonization of GAAP and IFRS.  Each year’s winning paper, selected by academic and professional representatives of Beta Alpha Psi, was published in an academic journal.

The manuscript awards were a highly competitive and a valued competition for many years.